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Emergency Preparedness Plan

MAKE A FAMILY PLAN (Return to top)

Plan in advance what you will do in an emergency. Depending on your circumstances and the nature of the event, the first important decision is whether you shelter in place or evacuate.

CREATE A PLAN TO SHELTER-IN-PLACE

There are situations when staying in put and creating a barrier between you and potential contamination is the best idea, maybe even a matter of survival. Choose an interior room or one with as few windows and doors as possible and if directed seal doors, windows, and air vent with plastic sheeting.

ESTABLISH AN EVACUATION PLAN

Plan in advance how you will reunite with your family. Know destinations in more than one direction and be familiar with alternate routes and transportation. If you do not have a car, plan how you will leave if you have to. Remember your 3-day kit and lock the door behind you.

HAVE A FAMILY COMMUNICATIONS PLAN

Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so plan how you will contact one another. Have a plan that each person contacts the same friend or relative in an emergency situation so that there is a common point of contact and information can be shared more easily.

Remember:

Click here to download a family communications plan (PDF)

CREATE A KIT (Return to top)

Having a 3-Day Kit ready and packed will help prepare your family in the case of an emergency or evacuation. Keep the following items in a sturdy and easy-to-carry container and make sure it’s ready to go at all times during the year:

PLAN FOR YOUR PETS (Return to top)

The single most important thing that you can do to protect your pets if you evacuate is to take your pets with you! If it's not safe for you to stay in the disaster area, it's not safe for your pets.

KNOW YOUR PET'S NEEDS

Each pet is unique and only you as the owner knows what they do and do not need in times of great distress. Below is a guideline for a disaster kit for your pet. Add and eliminate as needed for each pet.

KNOW YOUR OPTIONS

Before a disaster research the different shelters that are available in your community where you can place your pets during a disaster. Learn any rules or restrictions that they may have and adjust your Disaster Kit accordingly. Always remember that most shelters do not allow animals, so you must plan ahead.

Here are some preferred options for providing for your pets in a disaster outside of an emergency shelter: Hotels/motels, friends, kennels, local animal shelter, veterinarian clinic and family outside of the impacted community.

DON'T FORGET ID

Your pets should be wearing up-to-date identification at all times. It's a good idea to include a number of a friend or relative outside your immediate area. If possible, have your pets micro-chipped as it is the most effective form of identification for lost pets. For more information on micro-chipping, click here.

REMEMBER!

Keep physical control of your pet at all times. Pets can become very confused and hard to handle during times of disaster and may not respond to voice commands no matter how well they are trained! For a complete brochure on pets in disaster, click here.